Turfgrass

In the southwest, irrigation of landscapes accounts for approximately 50% of total domestic water-use in urban areas. Based on some surveys, more than half of this water could be conserved without adversely affecting the quality of existing landscapes if irrigations were carefully scheduled to satisfy plant needs (ET for acceptable quality.)

Irrigation Auditing

New Mexico Office of the State Engineer provides A Water Conservation Guide for Public Utilities that incorporates a residential landscape audit section on pages 104-110 of the PDF file. The landscape audit can be conducted by a certified landscape auditor or a homeowner with knowledge of irrigation systems. The manual describes how to evaluate sprinkler irrigation system performance, explains how to efficiently schedule irrigation on turfgrass, and determine annual savings of water and money.

Irrigation Design

The Basic Irrigation Design Princples presentation was given at the Southwest Turfgrass Association Recreational Landscape Conference and Expo Albuquerque, NM October 27‐29, 2014 by Daniel Smeal (CID, CLIA) New Mexico State University’s Agricultural Science Center at Farmington. You may request a portable document format file of the presentation by submitting an email to Margaret West.

Turfgrass Management

In New Mexico, turfgrass is comprised of industrial and institutional grounds, home lawns, and recreational spaces. Quality water-wise turf provides site beautification, recreation, and erosion control. The Turfgrass Research and Management presentation was given at the Pesticide Applicators Workshop on February 28, 2007 by Daniel Smeal, New Mexico State Unversity's Agricultural Science Center at Farmington. You may request a portable document format file of the presentation by submitting an email to Margaret West.

Turfgrass Selection

Turfgrass is grown to improve the landscape throughout New Mexico. Thus selection of turgrass is of regional importance. Turfgrasses of Northern New Mexico Guide H-511 characterizes and suggests turfgrass choices for northern New Mexico.

Water Requirements

A study conducted at the Agricultural Science Center at Farmington, from 1998-2001, identified the water requirements of some cool and warm season turfgrasses. These findings resulted in the formulation of consumptive-use curves and crop coefficients that can be used to efficiently schedule irrigations on turfgrass.
    A Practical Guidel to Managing Irrigation on Turfgrass
    Scheduling Irrigation on Turgrass Using the New Mexico Climate Center
publication and educational presentation in portable document format (PDF) may be request via email to Margaret West.